CLE-Accredited Podcast Interviews with the Titans of Law

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Members can enjoy MCLE Podcast access for one year from signup. Now enjoy 30% off membership membership (regularly $125). The TalksOnLaw California MCLE Podcast includes all 25 hours need for the Calbar MCLE requirement.


The TalksOnLaw MCLE Podcast offers interactive CLE/MCLE credit to satisfy all 25 hours of CLE required by the State Bar of California.  Enjoy our evolving catalog of podcast interviews with the titans of law

 


65
The Leaked Opinion, Dobbs v. Jackson

On May 2, 2022, Politico published a leaked initial draft majority opinion of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization that was predicted to be released in June. Chief Justice John Roberts confirmed the authenticity of the leaked opinion and stressed that the draft was not final. In the draft opinion authored by Justice Samuel Alito, the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey and upholds a Mississippi law banning abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. TalksOnLaw’s Joel Cohen unpacks Alito’s leaked opinion in which Alito traces the history of abortion laws in the U.S., explains the reasoning for overturning Roe, and addresses stare decisis.

0.5 CREDITS
General
64
Human Information Privacy (Part 2)

As troves of personal data are collected, stored, and used by governments and private companies in today’s digital age, privacy is becoming an increasing concern. Privacy is essentially about setting boundaries to limit the power that information confers on entities, whether public or private, over individuals. Without adequate privacy safeguards, governments have a blank check to interfere in legitimate political exercise. Companies are free to manipulate consumers through “dark patterns” and presenting an illusion of choice. Professor Neil Richards of the University of Washington in St. Louis School of Law explores where the U.S. legal framework potential falls short, namely in consumer protection against private entities, and the problems he sees ripe for reform. He proposes a few starting points to craft meaningful regulations for privacy, including combating deception and restricting surveillance-based advertising.

 

Watch Part 1 of Human Information Privacy.

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63
Human Information Privacy

As troves of personal data are collected, stored, and used by governments and private companies in today’s digital age, privacy is becoming an increasing concern. Privacy is essentially about setting boundaries to limit the power that information confers on entities, whether public or private, over individuals. Without adequate privacy safeguards, governments have a blank check to interfere in legitimate political exercise and companies are free to manipulate consumers through “dark patterns.” Professor Neil Richards of Washington University in St. Louis School of Law discusses why privacy matters in the digital age and the current framework of constitutional protections against government surveillance. He then explores where the U.S. legal framework falls short, namely in consumer protection against private entities, and the ways in which the digital world is designed by tech companies to steer consumers into giving up ever more personal information.

 

Watch Part 2 of Human Information Privacy.

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62
Cyberattack as Use of Force (Part 2)

Cyberwarfare has muddled the understanding of what constitutes the use of force and armed attacks under international law. The 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine has once again highlighted the risks that states and private entities face in the new realm of cyberwarfare and the need for establishing and clarifying international norms in this context. The Biden administration in March urged private entities to bolster their cyber defenses and warned that the U.S. was prepared to use all tools available to respond to cyberattacks. Under international law, whether those tools may include military responses hinges on determining that a cyberattack is an unlawful use force equivalent to an armed attack. Professor Duncan Hollis of Temple Law explains the standards proposed to assess whether a cyberattack amounts to a use of force and how states may respond when non-state actors engage in cyber operations. Lastly, he discusses influence operations, a type of cyber operation targeted at a certain population designed to affect behaviors or attitudes, and to what extent international laws and norms apply when influence operations do not involve use of force.

 

Watch Part 1 of Cyberattack as Use of Force.

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61
Cyberattack as Use of Force

Cyberwarfare has muddled the understanding of what constitutes the use of force and armed attacks under international law. The 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine has once again highlighted the risks that states and private entities face in the new realm of cyberwarfare and the need for establishing and clarifying international norms in this context. The Biden administration in March urged private entities to bolster their cyber defenses and warned that the U.S. was prepared to use all tools available to respond to cyberattacks. Under international law, whether those tools may include military responses hinges on determining that a cyberattack is an unlawful use force equivalent to an armed attack. Professor Duncan Hollis of Temple Law explains the development of international cyberspace law, starting with the preliminary questions of whether and how existing international laws apply. He explores the issues with international law’s application to cyberspace, including interpretive disagreements among states and the challenges of developing norms when cyber activities are covert.

 

Watch Part 2 of Cyberattack as Use of Force.

0.5 CREDITS
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60
Law of Bourbon

Bourbon is a uniquely American spirit and has played an outsized role in developing important aspects of American law. Bourbon history is peppered with dramatic legal battles and legal innovations, whether it’s laying the foundation for trademark protections or establishing the concept of brand name in the 1800s. Brian Haara, attorney and author of Bourbon Justice: How Whiskey Law Shaped America, explains how bourbon is legally defined and explores the whiskey’s shady past and the legal concepts that bourbon helped build, from trademark to consumer protection to truth in advertising.

0.5 CREDITS
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59
Investigating the Client

An Ethical Dilemma

If a lawyer suspects, but does not know, that a client or potential client is seeking their services to engage in criminal activity, can they still offer legal counsel? When does a lawyer have a duty to investigate her own clients? In its Formal Opinion 491 issued in 2020, the American Bar Association addressed lawyers’ obligations to inquire further to determine whether a client may be attempting to perpetrate a crime or fraud. Professor Peter Joy, legal ethics scholar, explains the ethics rules governing the lawyer’s scope of representation. He examines the standards put forth in Opinion 491 and raises surprising questions as to whether such standards actually fit with the ethics rules as they are drafted.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
58
Ethics and Batson

Excluding Jurors Based on Race

The United States has a long history of racial discrimination in juries. In 1875, Congress passed the Civil Rights Act which prohibited race-based discrimination in jury service. Yet, states continued to remove Black prospective jurors, by instituting vague requirements for jury service or designating prominent citizens to compile juror lists, and then shifted to excluding jurors from jury selection from around the 1960s.  Despite the landmark 1986 case Batson v. Kentucky in which the Supreme Court held that the state may not use peremptory challenges to exclude jurors solely on the basis of race and set out a standard to determine whether a peremptory strike was discriminatory, the practice persists today. Legal ethics scholar Professor Peter Joy explains the Batson standard and the ways in which the framework falls short. He discusses the legal ethics of racial discrimination in jury selection and considers alternatives to peremptory challenges to combat discrimination.

 

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
57
Memory Evidence (Part 2)

Neuroimaging in the Courts

In 2008, a woman in India was convicted of murder for the death of her fiancé on the basis of evidence derived from a brain-based memory detection exam. The test measured brain activity which purportedly indicated that she had personal knowledge of the poisoning of the victim. While such technology is highly controversial and not in common use in U.S. courts, significant advances in brain science now justify analysis of both the potential applications of memory evidence as well as the constitutional implications of doing so.

In part 2 of this 2-part interview, Professor Emily Murphy of UC Hastings Law evaluates how evidence from brain-based memory detection may be admitted in courts under Daubert. She then explores whether such evidence should be admitted even if the technology were perfect, given technological and biological limits, and how it may infringe upon constitutional and privacy rights if the government compels individuals to undergo brain imaging to decode memories.

Watch Part 1 of Memory Evidence.

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56
Memory Evidence

Neuroimaging in the Courts

In 2008, a woman in India was convicted of murder for the death of her fiancé on the basis of evidence derived from a brain-based memory detection exam. The test measured brain activity which purportedly indicated that she had personal knowledge of the poisoning of the victim. While such technology is highly controversial and not in common use in U.S. courts, significant advances in brain science now justify analysis of both the potential applications of memory evidence as well as the constitutional implications of doing so.

In part 1 of this 2-part interview, Professor Emily Murphy of UC Hastings Law explains the current state of brain-based memory detection technology and how it differs from lie detection tests. She discusses the hypothetical use cases for forensic purposes and the framework for admissibility of expert testimony under the Daubert standard.

Watch Part 2 of Memory Evidence.

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55
Policing the Police (Part 2)

Police officers have broad authority and discretion to enforce order — they can take property, stop, detain, and arrest people — at times under threat of lethal force. With such great power comes a significant risk of abuse, evidenced by the high-profile instances of brutality and misconduct. The challenge of regulating police is crafting effective and tailored rules to allow police officers to do their jobs of maintaining public safety and promoting order without infringing on individual rights or causing other unintended harm. In this conversation, we explore the laws that regulate the police with Professor Rachel Harmon of UVA Law and the director of its Center for Criminal Justice.

In part 2 of this 2-part series, Professor Harmon explains the constitutional right to record the police and under what circumstances that right may be limited, and explores the potential federal reforms that may bring about systemic changes in policing.

Watch Part 1 of Policing the Police.

0.5 CREDITS
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54
Policing the Police

Police officers have broad authority and discretion to enforce order — they can take property, stop, detain, and arrest people — at times under threat of lethal force. With such great power comes a significant risk of abuse, evidenced by the high-profile instances of brutality and misconduct. The challenge of regulating police is crafting effective and tailored rules to allow police officers to do their jobs of maintaining public safety and promoting order without infringing on individual rights or causing other unintended harm. In this conversation, we explore the laws that regulate the police with Professor Rachel Harmon of UVA Law and the director of its Center for Criminal Justice.

In part 1 of this 2-part series, Professor Harmon explains the jurisprudential framework of policing. She then explores the constitutional and statutory limits of police conduct, including the use of deadly and non-deadly force in police-citizen encounters, arrests for protests and verbal opposition, and “contempt of cop” or retaliatory arrests.

Watch Part 2 of Policing the Police.

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53
Space Law — Rights and Resources (Part 2)

At the height of the space race in the 1960s, countries around the world first ratified the Outer Space Treaty to prevent any nuclear conflict from extending into outer space and to ensure its use for peaceful purposes. Today, there’s a new kind of space race, one that involves private tourism and resource mining and extraction. And with more players in the mix, including nation-states like India and China and private companies like Blue Origin and SpaceX, how will existing treaties and customary international law apply? In part 2 of this 2-part series, space law expert Professor Frans von der Dunk discusses how the Outer Space Treaty applies to space tourism and other private space activities and explains the laws on militarization and weaponization of space.

 

Watch Part 1 of Space Law — Rights and Resources.

0.5 CREDITS
General
52
Space Law — Rights and Resources

At the height of the space race in the 1960s, countries around the world first ratified the Outer Space Treaty to prevent any nuclear conflict from extending into outer space and to ensure its use for peaceful purposes. Today, there’s a new kind of space race, one that involves private tourism and resource mining and extraction. And with more players entering the field, including nation-states like India and China and private companies like Blue Origin and SpaceX, how will existing treaties apply? Space law expert Professor Frans von der Dunk explores how the Outer Space Treaty and customary international law applies to modern space activities and addresses the open questions of property rights for celestial and lunar natural resources and liability issues when private enterprises operate in space.

 

Watch Part 2 of Space Law — Rights and Resources.

0.5 CREDITS
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51
A Failure of Forensics (Part 2)

Problems in forensic labs have contributed to scores of wrongful convictions, resulting in innocent individuals being imprisoned for years, sometimes decades. In recent years, major scandals have revealed problems at labs because of inadequate resources, lack of standards and oversight, management issues, and insufficient training. In part 2 of this 2-part series, Professor Brandon Garrett and Dr. Peter Stout discuss how the Houston Forensic Science Center (often regarded as a model of reform) operates, including implementing blind quality control programs and independent oversight. They explore the legal and policy changes that can be instituted at the lab level and systemwide to address the failures in forensic labs.

 

Watch Part 1 of A Failure of Forensics.

0.5 CREDITS
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50
A Failure of Forensics

Problems in forensic labs have contributed to scores of wrongful convictions, resulting in innocent individuals being imprisoned for years, sometimes decades. In recent years, major scandals have revealed problems at labs because of inadequate resources, lack of standards and oversight, management issues, and insufficient training. In part 1 of this 2-part series, Professor Brandon Garrett of Duke Law School and Dr. Peter Stout of the Houston Forensic Science Center explain the impact forensic evidence can have at trial and the severe consequences when forensic labs get it wrong. They discuss the sway of forensic evidence among juries, how judges determine the admissibility of forensic evidence, and the role of defense attorneys in the courtroom.

 

Watch Part 2 of A Failure of Forensics.

0.5 CREDITS
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49
The Ethical Limits of Negotiations (Part 2)

Ethics rules guide lawyer behavior, tactics, and strategy in negotiations. The rules prescribe the duties and responsibilities with regard to the client-lawyer relationship and to opposing counsel and third parties. Professor Carrie Menkel-Meadow of UC Irvine Law explores the boundaries of ethics requirements in negotiations. In part 2 of this 2-part series, she explores the tactics and behaviors permissible and impermissible, including bullying and threats, and the concept of fairness in negotiations.

 

Watch Part 1 of The Ethical Limits of Negotiations.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
48
The Ethical Limits of Negotiations

Ethics rules guide lawyer behavior, tactics, and strategy in negotiations. The rules prescribe the duties and responsibilities with regard to the client-lawyer relationship and to opposing counsel and third parties. Professor Carrie Menkel-Meadow of UC Irvine Law explores the boundaries of ethics requirements in negotiations. In part 1 of this 2-part series, she explores the rules on truthful statements, fraud, misrepresentation, and disclosure; facts versus opinions; and the tactics and behaviors permissible and impermissible in negotiations, including bluffing and puffing.

 

Watch Part 2 of The Ethical Limits of Negotiations.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
47
COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates

With COVID-19 vaccinations lagging, some states, universities, and other businesses have turned to vaccine mandates, requiring employees and or customers be vaccinated. In contrast, other states like Arkansas, Montana, and Utah have passed legislation restricting vaccination requirements. Professor Dorit Reiss of UC Hastings Law explains the constitutionality of vaccine mandates and the open question of whether vaccines approved under emergency use authorization or "EUAs" may be mandated. She explains the divergent paths states, employers, and universities have taken and the mounting legal challenges against each of these laws and policies.

0.5 CREDITS
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46
Shadow Immigration and the Power of the Presidency

The president wields immense power to shift immigration policy and shape the lives of nearly 11 million undocumented immigrants who live in the shadow of the U.S. immigration system. Regulatory and demographic changes over the last century have resulted in a large undocumented population in America, particularly from Mexico and Central America. Without a path to legalization, undocumented immigrants remain deportable at any time and subject to the discretion of the enormous immigration enforcement bureaucracy. In part 1 of this 2-part series, Professors Adam Cox and Cristina Rodriguez, co-authors of The President and Immigration Law, explain the changes that have led to this massive shadow immigration system. They explore how the president came to sit atop a supersized enforcement bureaucracy and trace how deportation enforcement priorities have increasingly dominated U.S. immigration policy under recent administrations.

Watch Part 2 of Shadow Immigration and the Power of the Presidency.

0.5 CREDITS
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45
Combatting Wildfires

The western United States is now experiencing four times more wildfires than ever before. In recent years, wildfires have become larger and more frequent, threatening lives and devastating local communities. A century of wildland fire management policy, climate change, and land development patterns in the West have created a perfect storm of a wildfire crisis. Professor Stephen R. Miller examines the factors proliferating wildfires and complicating effective wildland fire management, including the regulatory structure and the patchwork of federal, state, local, and tribal agencies responsible for fire planning and response.

0.5 CREDITS
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44
Who's Liable After GameStop: Litigators' Take

In early 2021, shares of GameStop (GME) spiked, jumping nearly 1000% amid weeks of volatile trading. In the aftermath, several players, including Robinhood, Redditors, and market makers like Citadel face increased risk of liability and regulatory scrutiny for their roles in the GameStop saga. Kenneth Breen and Phara Guberman, partners at Paul Hastings, explain how the events unfolded and break down the legal issues involved, including market manipulation, breach of contract, and potential FINRA violations. They discuss the standards required to show pump and dump schemes and case law that may provide color on how the events should be evaluated.

 

Watch Who's Liable After GameStop: A Law Professor's Take.

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43
Who's Liable After GameStop: A Law Professor's Take

In early 2021, shares of GameStop (GME) spiked, jumping nearly 1000% amid weeks of volatile trading. The rally was initially spurred by discussions of shorting the stock in the Reddit subreddit r/wallstreetbets, and many of those traders flocked to Robinhood, an online broker-dealer known for its commission-free trades. At the height of activity, Robinhood temporarily restricted trading of GME and other similar stocks. In the aftermath, several players, including Robinhood, Redditors, and market makers like Citadel face increased risk of liability and regulatory scrutiny. Corporate and securities law professor James Cox discusses the conditions that created the GameStop saga, its potential impact on the capital markets, and how regulators may review the trading frenzy.

 

Watch Who's Liable After GameStop: Litigators' Take.

0.5 CREDITS
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42
Climate Change Law Under Biden

The climate crisis threatens global food, health, housing, and social security and displace millions, if not billions, of people. A major cause of rapid climate change is the dramatic increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the atmosphere driven by human activity over the past century. In fact, the past five years have been the five warmest years on record, and all signs point to a continuing trend unless massive steps are taken to slow down and reverse the tide. The international community has been grappling with climate change for decades. Under the Kyoto Protocol, adopted in 1997 and entered into force in 2005, signatory states committed to reducing GHG emissions, but the United States notably did not sign on. In 2015, over 190 countries, including the U.S., adopted the Paris Agreement under which countries pledged to a more flexible framework with strengthened GHG emissions reduction goals. Michael Gerrard, professor at Columbia Law School and the faculty director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change law, examines the international and domestic framework of climate change law, including the development of the Kyoto Protocol and Paris Agreement, and the evolution of domestic policies under the past two administrations and how some states have responded.

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41
Vulnerable Populations in a Pandemic

In the COVID crisis, the most impacted groups include the most vulnerable segments of our population. In this 3-part interveiw, Alexis Hoag first explains how prisoners are affected by the pandemic and how recent precedence informs their ability to assert their legal rights to access healthcare and safe conditions. Professor Olatunde Johnson then explores what some states have done to ensure access to essential services like utilities and broadband and delves into the pandemic's impact on contract and gig workers. Lastly, Professor Jane Spinak describes how family courts have been responding to the crisis and the important role lawyers play as advocates for children and families.

(This interview is a part of our "Law in the Time of Covid-19" collaborative series with Columbia Law School)

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40
Abandoned DNA and the Ownership of Sperm (Part 2)

Are DNA, human tissue, and sperm "property"? What rights do you have over discarded DNA or cells that you shed everyday? Can you be sued for paternity for donating sperm or "stolen" sperm? Professor Glenn Cohen explores these questions and more.

Watch Part 1 of Abandoned DNA and the Ownership of Sperm.

0.5 CREDITS
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39
Abandoned DNA and the Ownership of Sperm

Are DNA, human tissue, and sperm "property"? What rights do you have over discarded DNA or cells that you shed everyday? Can you be sued for paternity for donating sperm or "stolen" sperm? Professor Glenn Cohen explores these questions and more.

Watch Part 2 of Abandoned DNA and the Ownership of Sperm.

0.5 CREDITS
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38
Lawyering Beyond State Lines

Drafting client emails on an airplane, reviewing an agreement while vacationing out-of-state - lawyers all do this, but are they running afoul of ethics rules? As clients are increasingly doing business across multiple state lines, today's lawyers need to know the pitfalls and safe harbors in multijurisdictional practice. Sarah McShea, legal ethics guru, breaks down this murky area.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
37
A Different Path to the Bench

Despite increasing numbers of minorities and women in law schools and state bars, there continues to be a lack of diversity in the judiciary. As the first female South Asian judge in New York, Judge Rajeswari talks about her unique path to the judgeship and why diversity on the bench matters.

0.5 CREDITS
Elimination of Bias in the Legal Profession
36
The Dangers of a Lateral Move

What are the do's and don'ts for lawyers making lateral jumps from one firm to another? Sarah McShea, legal ethics guru, reveals the hidden dangers and breaks down the ethics minefield in conflicts, communications with client, fiduciary duties to the law firm, and more.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
35
When Law Firms Collapse

When law firms fail, they don't just dissolve - they implode. John Morley of Yale Law explains the unique fragility that has resulted in the spectacular collapse of firms like Dewey LeBoeuf, Howrey, and Brobeck.

0.5 CREDITS
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34
Overachieving, Anxiety, & Addiction (Part 2)

Lisa was a young, high-powered corporate attorney in the ‘90s, in denial of her alcohol dependency and hiding her spiraling addiction until she couldn’t. Unfortunately, Lisa’s experience isn’t uncommon in the legal profession—a quarter of lawyers qualify as problem drinkers. Lisa chronicles her own struggle with alcohol and substance abuse and road to recovery, and discusses the strategies and resources available to lawyers and employers to improve lawyer well-being.

Watch Part 1 of Overachieving, Anxiety, & Addiction.

0.5 CREDITS
Competence Issues
33
Overachieving, Anxiety, & Addiction

Lisa was a young, high-powered corporate attorney in the ‘90s, in denial of her alcohol dependency and hiding her spiraling addiction until she couldn’t. Unfortunately, Lisa’s experience isn’t uncommon in the legal profession—a quarter of lawyers qualify as problem drinkers. In this 2-part series, Lisa chronicles her own struggle with alcohol and substance abuse and road to recovery, and discusses the strategies and resources available to lawyers and employers to improve lawyer well-being.

Watch Part 2 of Overachieving, Anxiety, & Addiction.

0.5 CREDITS
Competence Issues
32
The Internet of Things – The Latest Frontier (Part 2)

By 2020, Internet of Things (IoT) related consumer spending is projected to hit $2.6 trillion, and over 6.4 billion devices will be connected. What impact will the surge of IoT devices have on how we interact with the world, and how will it affect data security and privacy rights? Host Joel Cohen sits down with John Heitmann and Jameson Dempsey to find out.

Watch Part 1 of The Internet of Things – The Latest Frontier.

0.5 CREDITS
General
31
The Internet of Things – The Latest Frontier

By 2020, Internet of Things (IoT) related consumer spending is projected to hit $2.6 trillion, and over 6.4 billion devices will be connected. What impact will the surge of IoT devices have on how we interact with the world, and how will it affect data security and privacy rights? Host Joel Cohen sits down with John Heitmann and Jameson Dempsey to find out.

Watch Part 2 of The Internet of Things – The Latest Frontier.

0.5 CREDITS
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30
From Super PACs to Dark Money (Part 2)

American political campaigns are increasingly financed by Super PACs and shadowy nonprofits. Some believe that too much money being funneled by special interest groups and wealthy donors opens the door to corruption and influence buying. Host Suraj Patel sits down with Professor Briffault to explore campaign finance laws and the key issues of contention to get to the bottom of this complicated debate.

Watch Part 1 of From Super PACs to Dark Money.

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29
From Super PACs to Dark Money

American political campaigns are increasingly financed by Super PACs and shadowy nonprofits. Some believe that too much money being funneled by special interest groups and wealthy donors opens the door to corruption and influence buying. Host Suraj Patel sits down with Professor Richard Briffault to explore campaign finance laws and the key issues of contention to get to the bottom of this complicated debate.

Watch Part 2 of From Super PACs to Dark Money.

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28
The Right to an Attorney - Currently Under Threat

The Sixth Amendment provides a right to counsel for indigents in criminal cases, but that right may be an empty promise when public defense organizations lack funding to provide adequate assistance. Seymour James, Attorney-in-Chief of The Legal Aid Society, explains the impact on access to justice for the poor when that right is undermined.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
27
The Battle at the Ballot: Voting Rights Act Today

50+ years after the end of Jim Crow, voting rights remains a hotly contested issue. Professor Issacharoff explains to guest host Suraj Patel the history of voter suppression and the Voting Rights Act, and breaks down the modern debate to its elements.

0.5 CREDITS
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26
Gerrymandering: The Art of Redrawing Elections

Gerrymander is a portmanteau of salamander + Gerry, the last name of a former governor, and is a practice that is centuries old. But how does it work, how does it affect modern day elections, and is it time to reassess the practice? Professor Issacharoff, renowned scholar on the political process, explains to host Suraj Patel.

0.5 CREDITS
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25
When Lawyers Break the Law

Lawyers defend clients when they get in trouble with the law, but what happens when lawyers break the law? They could be subject not only to the criminal justice system but also the legal profession's disciplinary system. Hal Lieberman shares his wisdom with host, Joel Cohen.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
24
Regulating Finance: Dodd Frank Decoded

The Dodd-Frank Act was enacted as a response to the Great Recession of 2007, but what does this complex regulation do and has it fixed the problems or addressed the causes of the financial meltdown? Annette Nazareth explains.

0.5 CREDITS
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23
Lawyers with Bias

A Look at Implicit Bias in the Legal Profession

We all hold implicit biases which create blind spots that subconsciously affect our understanding and decision-making. Implicit bias has insidious consequences that continue to contribute to low diversity and inclusion rates in law. Paulette Brown, the first woman of color to be president of the American Bar Association, offers concrete examples of biases at play in the legal profession, and what lawyers, firms, and companies can do to mitigate its harmful effects.

0.5 CREDITS
Elimination of Bias in the Legal Profession
22
The Weapons of a Hostile Takeover

The poison pill, Pac-Man, golden parachute - these hostile takeover defense mechanisms have colorful names, but what do they all mean? Professor Morley breaks them down and explains how the laws have changed the landscape of M&A since the 1980s.

0.5 CREDITS
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21
Using Lawyers to Launder Money

When criminals use shell companies, offshore bank accounts, and real estate as money laundering vehicles, lawyers, whether knowingly or unknowingly, assist these transactions. Professor William Simon explains how an unwitting lawyer could be complicit in the money laundering enterprise, the basics of money laundering laws and the risk factors, and suggests best practices for lawyers.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
20
When Religious Freedom Harms Children (Part 2)

The First Amendment protects religious beliefs and conduct, but the right to free exercise of religion is not absolute. What happens when religious conduct endangers the health or well-being of a child? When can the government step in to protect children's interests or mandate vaccination and medical treatment for children? Professor Hamilton answers these questions and more in her analysis of religious freedom laws and exemptions.

Watch Part 1 of When Religious Freedom Harms Children.

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19
When Religious Freedom Harms Children

The First Amendment protects religious beliefs and conduct, but the right to free exercise of religion is not absolute. What happens when religious conduct endangers the health or well-being of a child? When can the government step in to protect children's interests or mandate vaccination and medical treatment for children? Professor Hamilton answers these questions and more in her analysis of religious freedom laws and exemptions.

Watch Part 2 of When Religious Freedom Harms Children.

0.5 CREDITS
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18
Regulating Guns: Smart Laws & Dumb Laws (Part 2)

With mass shootings frequently dominating the news, is it time for a renewed look at our gun laws? Professor John Donohue explains the current legal landscape and the gaps, and suggests changes that could reduce gun violence in the future.

Watch Part 1 of Regulating Guns: Smart Laws & Dumb Laws.

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17
Regulating Guns: Smart Laws & Dumb Laws

Frequent mass shootings raise important questions about the effectiveness of US gun laws. Professor John Donohue explains the current legal landscape and the gaps, and suggests changes that could reduce gun violence in the future.

Watch Part 2 of Regulating Guns: Smart Laws & Dumb Laws.

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16
The Criminal's Brain - Neuroscience in the Courtroom

In criminal justice, the mental state of the defendant can be critical, requiring courts to look at defendants thoughts as well as their actions. Outside of the courtroom, new research has shifted our understanding of how the human brain works.  How are are breakthroughs in neuroscience and new technologies such as brain scans being used in today's courts to judge guilt and calculate punishment? Professor Denno explores important criminal justice issues from the lens of modern neuroscience and explains the extent that evolving scientific insight is affecting the criminal justice system. 

0.5 CREDITS
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15
Food Labels - What Are You Eating?

The first iteration of the Food and Drug Act came about after Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle exposed atrocious conditions in meatpacking plants.  Today’s consumers are much more interested in not only what’s in their food and how it's made but the health consequences of what they eat. Lauren Handel breaks down food labeling laws and explains some of the recent litigation on misleading food labels.

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14
Analyzing Death - Race and Bias in Capital Punishment

After 30 years on death row, Henry McCollum was exonerated with the help of DNA evidence for the murder and rape of a young girl. With the risk of wrongful conviction so high, can capital punishment still be justified? Stanford Law Professor John Donohue scrutinizes the controversial practice and the particular biases that surround it.

0.5 CREDITS
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13
From Facebook to Tinder: The Ethics of Social Media

Facebook friending a judge, telling a client to "clean up" his Facebook, or an attorney tweeting, "Who wants to win next?" Nicole Hyland explains the common and uncommon ethical pitfalls in attorneys' social media use.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
11
Fashion Piracy & Anti-Counterfeiting

Counterfeiting has become exceedingly lucrative and is no longer limited to handbags and watches. Knock-offs include everything from medications to children's toys and food. Heather McDonald delves into the effects of this illicit industry and explains how she and others are combatting counterfeiters through legal means.

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10
The Power of the Prosecutor (Part 2)

Prosecutors hold immense power and discretion to inalterably change the lives of those they pursue. What limitations and responsibilities do they have in wielding this power? Hear from former prosecutors Professors Green and Roiphe as they discuss the broad discretionary powers prosecutors exercise and the ethical standards they must meet.

Watch Part 1 of The Power of the Prosecutor.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
9
The Power of the Prosecutor

Prosecutors hold immense power and discretion to inalterably change the lives of those they pursue. What limitations and responsibilities do they have in wielding this power? Hear from former prosecutors Professors Green and Roiphe as they discuss the broad discretionary powers prosecutors exercise and the ethical standards they must meet.

Watch Part 2 of The Power of the Prosecutor.

0.5 CREDITS
Legal Ethics
8
Dance as Intellectual Property

For a spectacular dance performance, many elements have to come together - choreography, dancers, music, the set, costumes - and surprisingly a good deal of lawyering. Elena Paul of Alvin Ailey Dance Company discusses the legal issues involved in running a premiere dance company and the intellectual property rights in dance.

0.5 CREDITS
General
7
Celebrity Justice & High Profile Defense

What goes into defending high-profile clients in criminal trials? Hear from veteran criminal defense attorney Benjamin Brafman on the unique challenges. Brafman discusses media strategy, cameras in the courtroom, maintaining attorney-client confidentiality, and the public's misperception of special treatment for celebrity defendants.

0.5 CREDITS
General
6
Police Technology - From Body Cameras to Facial Recognition

Rapid technological advancement is changing the way the law enforcement operate and interact with the public. Professor Bennett Capers explains how new technologies are being used by police departments across the country and the legal issues implicated.

0.5 CREDITS
General
5
Selling Human Organs (Part 2)

With millions of Americans waiting for life saving organ transplants, why are human organ sales criminally prohibited? Harvard professor and leading expert Glenn Cohen breaks down the regulations governing organ transplantation, describes the dangers of transplant tourism, and suggests alternative schemes that we may see in the coming years.

Watch Part 1 of Selling Human Organs.

0.5 CREDITS
General
4
Selling Human Organs

With millions of Americans waiting for life saving organ transplants, why are human organ sales criminally prohibited? Harvard professor and leading expert Glenn Cohen breaks down the regulations governing organ transplantation, describes the dangers of transplant tourism, and suggests alternative schemes we may see in the coming years.

Watch Part 2 of Selling Human Organs.

0.5 CREDITS
General
3
Police Power and Personal Rights (Part 2)

Stops, searches, and arrests: learn more about the rights you have and those you thought you had, from the man who helped write the Federal Rules of Evidence. Daniel Capra sits down with host, Joel Cohen, to explain.

Watch Part 1 of Police Power and Personal Rights.

0.5 CREDITS
General
1
Police Power and Personal Rights

Stops, searches, and arrests: explore the rights you have and those you thought you had, from the man who helped write the Federal Rules of Evidence. Prof. Daniel Capra sits down with host Joel Cohen to explain.

Watch Part 2 of Police Power and Personal Rights.

0.5 CREDITS
General